Lemon Myrtle

Lemon Myrtle

This is a combination of flavours, lemon, lime, lemon grass. This bush tucker herb has it all! A handy one to have in your panty and sprinkle on any dish to add a "lemon" zing.

Lemon Myrtle is found in the Australian rainforest, the aroma of this herb conjures up images of lush green forests and cool mountain glades. With a hint of citrus Lemon Myrtle complements many meals. It is the true essence of Australia.

Lemon Myrtle is used just as often for craft projects such as candle and soap making as it is by foodies. Buy some for cooking, for herbal teas or to use in your favourite soap recipe.

Lemon myrtle is a medium size native tree (3-20m) found in the Australian rainforest. Discovered by Baron Von Mueller in 1853. In the early 1990s it emerged as a promising culinary herb, the aroma of this herb conjures up images of lush green forests and cool mountain glades. It is the true essence of Australia. Lemon myrtle is used just as often for craft projects such as candle and soap making as it is by foodies. Buy some for cooking, for herbal teas or to use in your favourite soap recipe.

lemonm2INFORMATION
Backhousia citriodora (common names lemon myrtle, lemon scented myrtle, lemon scented ironwood) is a flowering plant in the family Myrtaceae, genus Backhousia. It is endemic to subtropical rainforests of central and south-eastern Queensland, Australia, with a natural distribution from Mackay to Brisbane. Other common names are sweet verbena tree, sweet verbena myrtle, lemon scented verbena, and lemon scented backhousia.

USES
Indigenous Australians have long used lemon myrtle, both in cuisine and as a healing plant. The oil has the highest citral purity; typically higher than lemongrass. It is also considered to have a "cleaner and sweeter" aroma than comparable sources of citral–lemongrass and Litsea cubeba.

CULINARY
Lemon myrtle is one of the well known bushfood flavours and is sometimes referred to as the "Queen of the lemon herbs". The leaf is often used as dried flakes, or in the form of an encapsulated flavour essence for enhanced shelf-life. It has a range of uses, such as lemon myrtle flakes in shortbread; flavouring in pasta; whole leaf with baked fish; infused in macadamia or vegetable oils; and made intotea, including tea blends. It can also be used as a lemon flavour replacement in milk-based foods, such as cheesecake, lemon flavoured ice-cream and sorbet without the curdling problem associated with lemon fruit acidity.
The dried leaf has free radical scavenging ability.

lemonm1ANTIMICROBIAL
Lemon myrtle essential oil possesses antimicrobial properties; however the undiluted essential oil is toxic to human cells in vitro. When diluted to approximately 1%, absorption through the skin and subsequent damage is thought to be minimal. Lemon myrtle oil has a high Rideal–Walker coefficient, a measure of antimicrobial potency.

Use of lemon myrtle oil as a treatment for skin lesions caused by molluscum contagiosum virus (MCV), a disease affecting children and immuno-compromised patients, has been investigated. Nine of sixteen patients who were treated with 10% strength lemon myrtle oil showed a significant improvement, compared to none in the control group. The oil is a popular ingredient in health care and cleaning products, especially soaps, lotions, skin-whitening preparations and shampoos.